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Iraq-Berlin documents a Kurdish Iraqi family that arrived in Berlin, Germany, in the winter of 2015. Ciwan, 41, Sada, 3, Adila, 7, Rejna, 27 (left to right) have been living in Germany for two years now, and have just moved out of group shelters and into their first own apartment. All four speak fluent German, and in fact, the children, Adila and Rejna, who attend nursery and school, speak better German than Kurdish at this stage. Rejna was one year old when they left, and she only has the faintest memory of Iraq.

Ciwan started an apprenticeship as an electrician a few months ago, outside of Berlin, and with a company that had a hard time finding young people who wanted to be trained as electricians. Sada wants to train as a social worker.

Yet despite all that, the family has been deemed ineligible for asylum in Germany.  Right now the family is protected from deportation through the Ciwan's job training, but their longer term future is very uncertain. Germany's current immigration law seems insufficient, as the only options to immigrate are to be granted asylum or to fulfill the income and wealth provisions that country has set for newcomers. Assignment for ZEIT online, December 2017, see here.

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